tmp-visual

Bachelor of Science in
Environmental Management and Technology (EVMT)

Courses
  • For the most updated course descriptions, please visit here .
  • Courses listed here will be offered based on resources available in each term and year. Details about course offerings in a particular term will be announced at course registration time.

ENVR 1001 EVMT Orientation [0 Credit(s)]

This is a year-long seminar series designed to help freshmen year students adapt to university life. Topics such as learning and time management skills, purpose of university education, and planning for personal and career development will be covered. For EVMT students in their first year of study only. Graded P or F.

ENVR 1030 Environment and Health [3 Credit(s)]

This course is intended for UG students of all backgrounds. The course will cover concepts in environmental health including topics on outdoor and indoor environments, workplace, water and sewage, food, genetically modified organism, solid waste, communicable diseases, vectors and control, injury prevention, ionizing and non-ionizing radiation, nanomaterials, environmental health standards, monitoring methods, energy related health issues, natural and manmade disasters, etc. The discussions on each of these topics will include nature of the issue, known and potential health effects, control and regulatory approaches. Local and regional examples will be used where applicable.

ENVR 1040 The Environment and Society – A Comprehensive Perspective [3 Credit(s)]

This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the interaction between society and the environment. The class will examine the social, technological and environmental impacts of human societies past to present. This will include evaluating select environmental issues, such as climate change, from economic, social, scientific, business and health points of view. For students in their first and second year of study or those with approval from instructor for enrolling in the course.

ENVR 1050 The Sustainable Citizen [3 Credit(s)]

This course examines threats to our civilization’s sustainability. What does science tell us about these threats? How does our consumption and lifestyle drive these threats? What can we, as citizens, do to make our civilization more sustainable? At the end of the course, students should be able to provide a balanced and accurate explanation of the scientific issues and the action we can take. For students in their first and second year of study or those with approval from instructor for enrolling in the course.

ENVR 1070 Thinking Big: Systems Thinking for Environmental Problems [3 Credit(s)]

This course is about developing systems thinking skills to solve complex environmental problems. Systems thinking emphasizes the “big picture”, linkages and interactions. Through an activity-based course students will develop systems diagramming skills, concepts and find unconventional solutions for complex environmental problems.

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Articulate the nature of a system, its complexity, self-organization and emergent processes.
  • Create systems diagrams for a reasonably complex environmental problem.
  • Analyze drivers, interactions between subsystems, and identify points of leverage within a system.
  • Analyze an environmental problem and provide system design recommendations.
  • Use systems thinking to develop creative ideas addressing environmental problems.

ENVR 1080 The Smart Consumer – Uncovering the Hidden Story behind the Product Label [3 Credit(s)]

The choices we make in daily life – the food we eat, the clothes we wear, the products and services we use – define our lifestyle. Many people intend to consume in a sustainable manner, but with vague “green promises,” complex ingredient lists, and opaque production processes, we often do not know what is inside the products we use and how they were made. This course will investigate the ingredients hidden in everyday products and explore features that make them unsustainable by applying a product life-cycle approach. The course will also provide insights into the factors that influence our consumption and give students opportunities (through small exercises, activities, and discussions) to explore ways in which smart consumption can be promoted and in which consumer-felt responsibility for sustainability can be increased. For students in their first and second year of study or those with approval from instructor for enrolling in the course.

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Comprehend what drives citizens to consume in an (un-)sustainable manner.
  • Explain the consequences of unsustainable consumer behavior on the environment and social welfare.
  • Identify critical product ingredients, categories and production steps by applying a life-cycle approach.
  • Interpret product ingredients and critically analyze “sustainable” claims to recommend areas of improvement for product labeling.
  • Create and develop tools that help to enhance consumer education and enable Hong Kong citizens make more sustainable purchasing choices.

ENVR 1150 Climate Change Impacts and Extreme Weather Events [3 Credit(s)]

[Alternate Code(s):CIVL 1150] As the extreme weather events emerge as one of the most prominent global risks, climate change and the accompanying natural disasters are no longer a side agenda, but play a critical role in maintaining sustainable societies and economies. This course aims to inspire students to take a broader perspective on environmental issues, in addition to advancing the scientific knowledge of climate change and extreme weather. To effectively achieve this purpose, the course introduces the case studies that emphasize the huge implications of extreme events (e.g. drought, flood, heat waves, typhoon) and their linkage with the warming due to greenhouse gases. This course also assesses the potential impacts of climate changes and extremes on social, economic and environmental sustainability through a multidisciplinary approach.

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the basic concept of natural climate variability and anthropogenic climate change.
  • Identify the physical mechanism and regional vulnerability of individual extreme events (heat waves, cold waves, droughts, floods, tropical cyclones).
  • Describe how anthropogenic warming can make extreme events more likely to happen.
  • Explain the general methodology for detecting and predicting climate change and technology which can be used in the fight against climate change.
  • Describe how extreme events can affect social, economic and environmental sustainability.
  • Assess the impacts of climate change and extreme weather events through a multidisciplinary approach.
  • Take a global viewpoint on international policy or actions to mitigate the effects of climate change.

ENVR 1170 Big History, Sustainability and Climate Change [3 Credit(s)]

[Alternate Code(s):CIVL 1170] Big History as an emerging interdisciplinary framework, provides a long term perspective to see the world through reconstructing the history from the big bang all the way to the present. In such a longer time scale, overview of stars, planetary and species evolution, as well as concepts in climate change and how it is related to sustainability of the planet’s environment for its current inhabitants, including humanity, will be discussed. The physical science basis, impacts, risk, mitigation and adaptation measures of climate change will also be investigated (including technical and social solutions). For local and regional vulnerabilities, such as extreme weather events, sea-levels rise, storm surge and coastal flooding, will be covered. The significance of collective learning under the big history framework, both as a driver for our exponentially growing impacts, as well as for better solutions, will be highlighted.

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Apply the Big History “complexity and fragility” and “collective learning” concepts to critically assess the social and political risks, vulnerabilities as well as business opportunities associated with climate change mitigation and adaptation measures.
  • Demonstrate integrative understanding of sustainability-related subjects under the Big History framework, including recognition of homo sapiens’ unique role in maintaining sustainability of ecosystem for us and many other species, and thus, to argue for or against a variety of audiences on controversial climate-related issues.
  • Synthesis observational evidences and understanding of modeling frameworks, then interpret and argue for/against the occurrence of anthropogenic climate change.
  • Understand historical contingencies from the shifting scales under Big History perspective and the relation of environmental impacts, the change of atmospheric composition and technology (collective learning) under the rapid industrial and economic development in the past 250 years.
  • Utilize physical principles to explain the science of star formation, planetary evolution, the greenhouse effect and global climate change.
  • Justify the rationales behind adoption of climate change mitigation and adaptation measures by governments and major corporations around the globe irrespective of climate modeling uncertainties and limitations.

ENVR 1811 Environmental Management and Technology Study Trip I [1 Credit(s)]

The course is a study trip that will provide students with the opportunity to travel with a faculty member to various study sites that have a diversity of environmental or sustainability issues and see and discuss issues at the site with practitioners. The course will require students to prepare a presentation on one particular site and write a reflective report on their experience. Approval from instructor is needed for enrolling in the course. The course may be repeated once for credit if the study sites are different. Grade P or F.

ENVR 2001 Academic and Professional Development I [1 Credit(s)]

This is the first course of the series designed to assist students in developing attributes necessary for professional growth. This course is a one-year course designed to provide academic advising to students, to enhance their understanding of the latest environment topics, and to improve their communication skills. Students are required to attend discussion sessions with advisors and selected seminars. For EVMT students only. Graded P or F.

ENVR 2002 Special Topics in Environmental Studies [1-4 Credit(s)]

Selected topics of current interest in environmental studies. May be repeated for credit, if the topics studied are different. Graded letter grade or P/F subject to different offerings.

ENVR 2010 Environmental Science Fundamentals [3 Credit(s)]

Understanding our environment, including the ecology, biodiversity and cycles of environmental ecosystems, human environmental impacts such as climate change, energy use, chemical toxicology, waste disposal, water and air pollution; conservation; exploration of new green technologies to reduce impacts, environmental law and changes in policies to ensure sustainability. Case studies through group projects.

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Critically examine a broad range of fundamental sciences related to environmental issues.
  • Develop understanding on the complex interaction among the physical, chemical and biological components and the environment.
  • Appreciate the important influence of HUMAN and scientific forces on the environment.
  • Develop analytic and presentation skills to locate and evaluate the interactive dynamics between environment and scientific principles.

ENVR 2020 Urban Air Pollution [3 Credit(s)]

The course is aimed at providing students with insights in how to deal with environmental problems and the way in which science interfaces with policies. It will cover major topics on the sources of air pollutions, air chemistry, oxidation of organic compounds and issues on control of air pollutant emissions and air quality management.

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Identify and describe the key pollutants in urban air that pose threat to public health.
  • Identify and describe the main sources of emissions that lead to urban air pollution problems.
  • Compare and contrast the most common methods for effectively preventing or controlling emissions of urban air pollution.
  • Explain the key principles by which the transport and transformation of air pollution in the urban environment are analyzed.
  • Define and discuss the principles of common air pollution measurement techniques.
  • Define and explain the difference between air quality and human exposure to air pollution.

ENVR 2030 Material and Energy Balance for Environmental Management [3 Credit(s)]

Material and energy balance provides a quantitative account for materials and/or energy redistribution when changes happen. It is a tool which can be used to predict or solve practical problems like pollution control and management, product life-cycle analysis and management of resources (e.g. energy, food and water) for sustainable development. This course will introduce students to the fundamental principles of material and energy balance as applicable to environmental management. Covered topics include pollution control and treatment and industrial/building energy management. For EVMT students only. Exclusion(s): CENG 2010 (prior to 2016-17), CENG 2110

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Gain basic understanding of environment and energy processes.
  • Familiarize with the jargon of environmentalists.
  • Come up ideas and assess ideas for environmental process improvements with quantitative measures.
  • Communicate effectively with engineers and technical managers.
  • Address environmental and energy problems in quantitative way.

ENVR 2050 Sustainability Thinking [3 Credit(s)]

[Previous Course Code(s) ENVR 3010G] We start with one simple question: is there something special or unique about a sustainability mindset that provides us better insights and tools for solving long-term or systemic problems? In this hands-on class we first start by challenging the traditional methods for making decisions, recognizing some typical thinking “blunders” that result in non-sustainable outcomes. We then explore several conceptual tools that can help us overcome these mistakes. We pay specific attention to building new skills associated with sustainability, like systems thinking, futures thinking, strategic thinking, values thinking, and complex problem solving. We then test out these mental tools by utilizing our campus as a “living laboratory” for developing and implementing several behavioral interventions to assess the effectiveness of different approaches. This is a flipped classroom – using online learning modules in place of lectures – with class time dedicated to theme based discussions and group exercises. Mode of Delivery: [EXP] Experiential learning, [BLD] Blended learning

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Have a working knowledge of specific mental models that contribute to understanding of sustainability thinking, and ability to demonstrate the ability to use them to solve difficult problems.
  • Have a functional understanding of the factors influencing sustainable behaviors, including social norms, incentives, the role of identity, forming new habits, and change management.
  • Have the ability to take raw data and organize it, looking for trends, patterns, and other means of analysis.

ENVR 2310 Introductory Environmental and Health Economics [3 Credit(s)]

[Alternate code(s) ECON 2310, SOSC 2310] This course introduces students to basic theories and findings in environmental and health economics. The emphasis is on how the economic models and concepts can be used to analyze environmental and health issues. The course begins with an introduction of theoretical economic concepts and models; then it moves on to several policy-relevant environmental and health topics. Particular issues include externality, common goods and public goods, valuation of environmental goods and health, market failure and health, environmental regulations, pollution and health, and the economics of climate change. For students in their first and second year of study or those with approval from instructor for enrolling in the course.

ENVR 2811 Environmental Management and Technology Study Trip II [1 Credit(s)]

This course is the second of two study trip courses directed at Division of Environment and Sustainability students in their second or third years of study. The course is a study trip that will provide students with the opportunity to travel with a faculty member to various study sites that have a diversity of environmental or sustainability issues and see and discuss issues at the site with practitioners. Students will prepare an in-depth presentation on one particular site and prepare a reflective report on their experience. Approval from instructor is needed for enrolling in the course. The course may be repeated once for credit if the study sites are different. Graded P or F.

ENVR 2900 Internship/Service Learning [1 Credit(s)]

The internship/service learning provides students a first-hand understanding of interconnected sectors of environment, business and society. Students will be working in teams enabling them to practice teamwork, communication and professional skills. The internship is a structured professional work experience in which students can apply their knowledge to problems and situations relevant to their professional preparation. Service learning benefits students by providing the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills to improve our community and solve real-world community problems as well as civic problems. The credit may be earned part-time during summer months. Students are required to take a pre-internship/service orientation session. May be repeated for credits if different topics are taken, but the total credits may not exceed two. Instructor’s approval is required for enrollment in the course. Graded P or F.

ENVR 3001 Academic and Professional Development II [1 Credit(s)]

This is second course of the series designed to assist students in developing attributes necessary for professional growth. This course is a one-year course designed to provide academic advising to students, to enhance their understanding of the latest environment topics, and to improve their communication skills. Students are required to attend discussion sessions with advisors and selected seminars. For EVMT students only. Graded P or F. Prerequisite(s): ENVR 2001

ENVR 3002 Introduction to Atmospheric Science [3 Credit(s)]

The course mainly consists of two parts: atmospheric physics and atmospheric chemistry. Atmospheric physics topics include evolution of the earth’s atmosphere, introduction to the atmospheric structure, composition, dynamics, thermodynamics, circulation, and weather patterns. Atmospheric chemistry topics include tropospheric chemistry, air pollution chemistry and toxicity, greenhouse gases and climate change, stratospheric chemistry and ozone depletion. For EVMT students and students with consent from the course instructor only. Exclusion(s): ENVS 3002 Prerequisite(s):(CIVL 1140 OR ENVR 2010 OR LIFS 1030 OR PHYS 1003) AND (MATH 1003 OR MATH 1013 OR MATH 1020 OR MATH 1023)

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Explain basic physical principles underlying atmospheric structure and motion.
  • Understand the causes of some weather phenomena conceptually.
  • Read and display weather charts.
  • Develop necessary programming skills to analyze meteorological datasets.

ENVR 3003 Green Buildings and Energy Efficiency [3 Credit(s)]

[Previous Course Code(s): ENVR 4000F] This is an introduction to Green Buildings and their Energy Management. The course will consider Green Building attributes together with their economic, social and environmental impacts. Emphasis will be given to their energy conservation and resulting Carbon Dioxide emission reductions. For students in their second year of study and above. Mode of Delivery: [BLD] Blended learning

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Know what makes a building sustainable – “Green”.
  • Know the importance of green buildings in relation to economic, social and environmental impacts across their full Life Cycle.
  • Know how green buildings are measured, assessed and certified.
  • Understand importance of sustainable energy use in buildings.
  • Know the key drivers of energy conservation.
  • Understand the Energy Dynamics of a building.
  • Know how to conduct a basic Energy Audit.
  • Be aware of relevant Tools, Statutory Bodies, Practices, Codes and Standards.

ENVR 3004 Life Cycle Assessment [3 Credit(s)]

[Previous Course Code(s): ENVR 2040, ENVR 2002B] Smart and sustainable solutions are globally on the rise. Product developers, designers, engineers from all sectors use Life Cycle Assessment to use quantitative evidence to proof that their product or innovation is truly more sustainable than existing solutions. Life Cycle Assessment is one of the most commonly used tools to measure the environmental, social and financial cost of a product or system and to allow a fair comparison. In this class students will (1) learn how to assess environmental life cycle impacts and identify options for resource conservation, and pollution prevention; (2) apply methods for Life Cycle Assessment on various products and systems, interpret results and judge the associated uncertainties; (3) interpret and evaluate case examples to gain a deeper understanding of the strengths, weaknesses and appropriate use of Life Cycle Assessment; (4) learn the necessary software basics to perform a moderately complex LCA under supervision.

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the relationship between the product life cycle and environmental impacts, resource conservation, and pollution prevention.
  • Implement the procedure of Life Cycle Assessment, including methods for inventory collection, modeling and impact assessment.
  • Interpret and evaluate case examples to gain a deeper understanding of the strengths, weaknesses and appropriate use of Life Cycle Assessment.
  • Apply methods for Life Cycle Assessment on various products and systems, interpret results and judge the associated uncertainties.
  • Perform a moderately complex LCA under supervision.

ENVR 3010 Special Topics in Environmental Studies [1-4 Credit(s)]

Selected topics of current interest in environmental studies. May be repeated for credit, if the topics studied are different. Graded letter grade or P/F subject to different offerings.

ENVR 3110 Sustainable Development [3 Credit(s)]

Sustainable development integrates improvements in human welfare with improvements in the health of the environment. It is societies attempt to solve the degradation that economic and social development has imposed on the environment. To solve environmental crises such as climate change, pollution, or destruction of biodiversity we need to integrate environmental practices into all our activities, pulling together new technologies, lifestyles, economic theories and business practices, and government policies. This course looks at how this process of integration works at the international, national, and municipal levels and from the organization perspectives of different industrial sectors, businesses, and communities. Prerequisite(s): CIVL 1170 OR ENVR 1170

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Integrate the principles and goals of sustainable development into sustainability efforts.
  • Analyze and critique existing socio-technical systems for environmental performance.
  • Explore, critique and apply options for transitioning socio-technical systems to achieve better environmental performance.
  • Design approaches for collective action problem solving and coordination among stakeholders.
  • Gain knowledge of several Hong Kong socio-technological systems that will be of future use in Hong Kong and elsewhere.
  • Develop and use the skills and competencies of a sustainability professional.

ENVR 3210 Environmental Technology [3 Credit(s)]

This course emphasizes on the fundamental science and engineering principles of the innovation, design, development and application of environmental technologies for conservation and pollution abatement. The course covers both existing and emerging environmental technologies for the sustainable development including energy conservation and renewable energies, carbon neutral lifestyle, green building, manufacturing and processing, technologies for improved air, water, soil qualities, waste reduction and reuse, etc. Exclusion(s): CIVL 2410 Prerequisite(s): ENVR 2010 AND ENVR 2030

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the science and technology behind today’s environmental technologies.
  • Carry out material and energy balance calculations and analyses of an environmental system or technology.
  • Analyze, calculate and compare life-cycles of products, processes and services with emphasis on the energy (NEC), carbon, environment (e-LCA, eco-indicator) and social (s-LCA) demands and impact.
  • Competent in making informed decision on selection, investment and implementation of technologies related to the betterment of the environment.

ENVR 3220 Energy Sources and Usage [3 Credit(s)]

This course provides students the opportunity to enhance their interdisciplinary understanding of different types of energy resources and their local, regional, and global use. While the focus is on specific fuels and their respective technologies and systems, the course also includes topics on energy transition, energy efficiency, and sustainable consumption. The course also embeds a critical evaluation of energy sources and use with respect to longer‐range energy security concerns and contemporary environmental concerns across scales especially the climate emergency.

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Have a holistic and systemic appreciation of the various energy sources and their use.
  • Review and evaluate the various social, environmental, economic and political issues surrounding energy sources from multiple perspectives.
  • Communicate balanced, evidence-based views of the issues and their possible solutions.
  • Equip with approaches and frameworks for action that can contribute to the sustainable use of various energy sources.
  • Take a considered view of their own energy use choices and their potential to contribute to sustainability as professionals and community leaders.

ENVR 3310 Green Business Strategy [3 Credit(s)]

This is a course about new strategic opportunities arising from environmental risks. Public and regulatory demand for environmental products and services must co-exist with the corporate institutions of maximizing shareholder wealth. This course examines both the theoretical and practical issues that arise in attempting to balance the health of the natural environment with value creation. Is there an inherent conflict between the institutions of business and our ability to care for the environment? What competitive opportunities are created for firms and what do they have to do to seize these opportunities? The lessons from the course will be of interest to both students of strategy and the environment. Exclusion(s): MGMT 3160

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the conceptual relationships between a firm’s business strategy and the natural environment.
  • Assess the efficacy of the incorporation of environmental perspectives into business design.
  • Analyze business situations to identify alternative environmental strategies and recommend environmentally responsible solutions.
  • Apply an understanding of environmental issues to business decisionmaking processes.
  • Synthesize an environmentally sustainable business model for a business.
  • Develop an understanding of the concepts of environmental stewardship, environmental ethics, and environmental and social responsibility.
  • Appreciate the need for professional behavior and teamwork.

ENVR 3410 Economics for Environmental Policy and Management [3 Credit(s)]

This course begins with a brief review of key economic principles (e.g., economic as distinct from engineering efficiency, comparing benefits and costs at the margin, discounting). It then moves on more in-depth treatments of areas that are the focus of environmental economics. These include externalities, common property resources, market failure, ‘valuation’ of un-priced impacts of economic activity, and policy instruments for controlling pollution and other forms of environmental degradation. Throughout the course, the emphasis is on fostering an intuitive understanding of the topics and how they relate to real world decision making. For EVMT students only. Prerequisite(s): ECON 2103 OR ECON 2113 OR ECON 3113

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Understand key concepts and theories in environmental economics.
  • Use economics models to explain and analyze environmental problems.
  • Understand the methods to value environmental goods and conduct benefit-cost analysis.
  • Analyze environmental policies using economics models.
  • Apply the knowledge learned in class to analyze new policies/environmental issues.

ENVR 3420 Environmental Law and Regulations [3 Credit(s)]

The course will provide students with the basic legal concepts which include the hierarchy of courts in Hong Kong, the difference between civil and criminal proceedings and their possible redresses or remedies available from the courts. Important provisions of the basic environmental legislation in Hong Kong, environmental prosecution policy of Hong Kong and how to investigate a judicial review against a ministerial decision relating to the environment will also be covered in the course.

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the legal system of Hong Kong.
  • Differentiate the civil and criminal law.
  • Read legislation paper and judicial precedent.
  • Apply the basic concepts of statutory interpretation and construction.
  • Comprehend the Environmental Legislation in Hong Kong.
  • Comprehend the considerations of a prosecutor before his instigation of environmental prosecutions.
  • Apply the environmental science in the enforcement of the environmental laws in Hong Kong.

ENVR 4000 Special Topics in Environmental Studies [1-4 Credit(s)]

Selected topics of current interest in environmental studies. May be repeated for credit, if the topics studied are different. Graded letter grade or P/F subject to different offerings.

ENVR 4001 Academic and Professional Development III [1 Credit(s)]

This is the third course of the series designed to assist students in developing attributes necessary for professional growth. This course is a 2-semester course designed to provide academic advising to students, to enhance their understanding of the latest environment topics, and to improve their communication skills. Students are required to attend discussion sessions with advisors and selected seminars. For EVMT students only. Graded P or F. Prerequisite(s): ENVR 2001 and ENVR 3001

ENVR 4010 Independent Study in Environment Issues [1-4 Credit(s)]

Faculty directed independent study of selected topics in Environmental issues. For EVMT students and students with consent from the instructor. Graded P or F.

ENVR 4220 Urban and Regional Planning [3 Credit(s)]

The course provides an introduction to the planning process in the public sector. Fundamental planning concepts, historical overview of planning, and planning methods comprise the first part of the course. These basic ideas will be followed by application of these principles to problems in urban and regional contexts. Specific topics include the legal basis for planning, land use planning and zoning, transportation planning, economic development, and environmental planning. In additional to conceptual considerations and application, attention will be given to the planning for sustainable development; strategies for conservation and management of critical natural resources; environmental ethics in land use development. For EVMT students and students with consent from the instructor.

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Associate the canon of urban planning discourse with contemporary planning conditions.
  • Analyse the environmental conditions of a city, including its limitations on resources, and its urban planning policies to overcome these constraints.
  • Apply concepts of authentic place-making to urban design.
  • Apply principles of urban legibility to urban analysis and design.
  • Apply principles of typology of city habitation and building types to urban design.

ENVR 4320 ESG Management and Reporting [3 Credit(s)]

This course covers systems for Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) management and reporting but with a strong focus on accounting and reporting on environmental aspects. It looks at (1) assessing an organization’s impact on society and the natural environment; (2) establishing procedures for managing, accounting for and reporting significant impacts; and (3) assessing and improving performance. The course covers case studies on problems and good practice. This is about how companies can both enhance their value and make human civilization more sustainable. For students in their third year of study and above.

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Explain why an organisation should address environmental and social issues and advise actions it can take.
  • Consider the ESG reporting requirements in the HK Companies Ordinance and Listing Rules.
  • Use various tools to help an organisation assess, plan, act and report their ESG issues.
  • Use various tools to help banks and investment managers make Socially Responsible Investments (SRI).
  • Demonstrate their skills in discussion and argumentative reasoning in oral presentations and short essays.

ENVR 4330 Environmental Geographical Information System [3 Credit(s)]

This course will cover a board spectrum of concepts and practices in Geographical Information System (GIS). It starts with the fundamental concepts and elements in geographic science and technology. Spatial data modeling and integration methods will then be discussed followed by various geospatial analysis approaches for both vector and raster data. Cartographic principles, spatial relationships, projection and coordinate systems will be discussed in-depth. During the course, students will be introduced to contemporary GIS software and apply GIS technology to support local and regional environmental planning and management. For EVMT students and students with consent from the instructor. Exclusion(s): ENVR 5330, EVSM 5240

ENVR 4480 Climate Modeling and Risk Assessment [3 Credit(s)]

[Previous Course Code(s): ENVR 4000O] [Alternate Code(s): CIVL 4480] Climate models are the complex mathematical representation of the major climate system components (e.g. atmosphere, ocean, land surface, etc) and their interactions. Climate models have proved to be the most valuable tools in understanding climate processes that determine the response of the climate system to anthropogenic forcings, such as increases in greenhouse gases concentrations and land use changes. This course provides an introduction to the physical principles of climate model as well as all procedures related to climate modeling. Some classes will be taught in the computer laboratory, where students will perform their own simulations using web-based climate model and analyze the results. In addition, this course explores the challenge of understanding and managing the risks of climate extremes. Prerequisite(s): MATH 1003 OR MATH 1012 OR MATH 1013 OR MATH 1020 OR MATH 1023)

On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate a solid understanding of the Earth’s climate system.
  • Describe greenhouse effect and its association with global warming.
  • Describe the structure of climate model and general procedure of climate modeling.
  • Describe how to analyze the performance and uncertainty of climate simulations.
  • Understand the limited reliability of climate model and interpret the simulation results based on the basic principles governing climate system.
  • Describe the key concepts and definitions relating to disaster risk management and adaptation to climate change.
  • Identify and assess the risk as a function of vulnerability and exposure.
  • Understand the approaches for reducing and managing disaster risk in a changing climate.
  • Gain integrated insights from specific case studies and synthesize the important progress in managing risk from climate extreme.

ENVR 4800 Environmental Management and Technology Seminar [1 Credit(s)]

This is a year-long seminar series presented by faculty members and guest speakers on selected topics in environmental management and technology. For EVMT students only. Graded P or F.

ENVR 4980 Environmental Management and Technology Capstone Project I [3 Credit(s)]

Each EVMT student is required to complete a capstone project before graduation. This is the first course of a two-term project in which the student can synthesize and apply knowledge from their courses. The project is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member.

ENVR 4990 Environmental Management and Technology Capstone Project II [3 Credit(s)]

Continuation of ENVR 4980. Prerequisite(s): ENVR 4980